3 Tips to Burn Fat Efficiently

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Getting your body in the best condition for effective fat & weight loss.

 

Do you workout at least three times a week, but don’t see the fats melting away? Yet you know of people who move no more than twice a week, still lose fat and keep it off. It almost seems unfair.

“What’s their secret?”, you think.

Well, there’s no secret. In the nutrition world, nutrition coaches have this simple formula for fat loss:

Calorie input > Calorie output = weight gain

Calorie input < Calorie output = weight loss

So if your body fat percentage and weight seems to have stagnated despite your best efforts, it’s time to look at your diet. Is it filled with refined and processed carbohydrates such as white bread, white rice/noodles, egg noodles, pasta, pizza, and cakes, or glucose- or sugar-laden energy drinks?

As you can quickly see, this is a carb-rich diet (sugar becomes carbs in the body). However, for fat loss, we need to reduce the consumption of carbohydrates so that the body burns fat. Thus, there has been increasing interest in Low-Carb-High-Fat diets that promote weight loss.

Other than What you eat, also equally important is When you eat and How much you eat. This is closely linked to the calorie output part of the equation, which we shall address below by looking at the science of what the body uses for fuel during intense activity periods.

 

FUEL SOURCES

Most people think that as long as they get in some form of exercise for 30-minutes, they are burning fat because their heart rate increases, they become short of breath, and they start to perspire profusely.   Unfortunately, when we do aerobic exercises, the most readily accessible fuel that the body uses is not fats, carbohydrates or protein — it is glycogen. This compound is produced from complex carbs found in vegetables or grains from our most recent meal, and it would have been stored in our liver and muscles. There’s usually 500g to 800g of stored glycogen, which is the main fuel for the first 60 to 90 minutes of moderate intensity exercise.

Thus, exercising for less than 30-minutes will barely touch your body fat reserves. All you’ve done is depleted your body glycogen reserve. Then if you hydrate with an energy drink mid-workout or post workout, the glycogen stores would have been replenished. No fat burning has happened!

So, how can the fat burning be activated? Here are three tips to get the fats melting, and staying off.

  1. High-Intensity Interval Training: As its name suggests, HIIT is high-intensity movements, done in short bursts with rests of the same duration in between each exercise. The intensity of this form of training activates the mitochondrial and fat burning functions of the body. It’s tough, but it is short, sharp, fuss free (no need of much equipment and can be done anywhere), and you continue to feel the effects of the workout for at least 24-hours after.

With regular training, your metabolism becomes stronger and your body will begin to burn fat more efficiently. Your body will also begin to generate ketones at low levels, also known as nutritional ketosis, which helps with memory, and also helps to burn fat as you sleep.

If you have specific weight loss goals to achieve, you can consider working with a personal trainer to adapt your HIIT workout to match your goals. There are even HIIT routines suitable for people with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and cancer.

After each HIIT workout, ensure that you consume about 20g of good quality protein to help your muscles to recover. Do this ideally within 30-minutes of completing the workout.

For a good quality protein that is easily absorbed by the body, opt for Clean Lean Protein — add a scoop to your water, coconut water, or nut mylk in a shaker bottle, and enjoy chilled.

  1. Superset Training: This is an alternative to HIIT workouts, and involves free weights. A form of strength training, a superset is when you alternate between two exercises without taking a rest in between. So as an example of a superset for the arms and shoulders, you would complete 20 reps of side lateral raise and immediately go into 20 reps of alternate dumbbell press. You may take a rest after this set to catch your breath or take a sip of water, before repeating the set another three times.

Likewise, the intensity of a superset training will activate the fat burn in your body.

Depending on your endurance, it is possible to train for 60-minutes when doing supersets. Should this be the case, consider adding branched chain amino acids and a good quality multi-nutrient with your protein, post workout. Here’s where a scoop of Good Green Stuff comes in handy: it is packed with more than 75 ingredients that meets your daily vitamin, minerals, and nutrient needs.

  1. Intermittent Fasting: If for some reason you’re unable to increase your output i.e. exercise, then you’ll have to decrease your input. One method that has long been used by athletes of sports that have weight class (powerlifting, mixed martial arts, rowing, boxing) is intermittent fasting. This is a pattern of eating less, and less often — a cycle of feasting followed by famine (more about this in the article Why Most Weight Loss Diets Fail).

On an intermittent fast, the rule is to eat no sooner than five hours after your last meal. Another rule is to eliminate all refined and processed carbohydrates, which we have mentioned earlier. Lastly, since it is a fast, snacks between meals are out too. Throw in a couple of training sessions when you’re on a fast, and your body will quickly shift into fat burning mode.

Usually, intermittent fasting should be taken on with the guidance of a nutrition or health coach. The coach will assess your training intensity and schedule, as well as your end-goal of the intermittent fasting, so as to come up with a fasting schedule and food plan suitable for you.

 

END GAME

By keeping in mind that weight loss happens when the output is more than the input, the choice is then to change our eating habits —how much, what, when — and/or increase our movement habits. When the conditions for the body is right, it will start to burn fat more efficiently.

Hazel – 70.3 World Championship, South Africa 2018

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One of the things I needed to work on was gaining power and muscle mass in preparation for the Ironman 70.3 World Championship. I decided to give Nuzest Clean Lean Protein a try as it is an all-natural product. After 5 months, I was at an optimal race weight and feeling a lot stronger and healthier than when I did my first Ironman 70.3 race. With that, I achieved a personal best in the Ironman 70.3 World Championship, Nelson Mandela Bay, South Africa 2018 race.

Thank you, Nuzest!

 

Turmeric for post-workout recovery

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We’ve all felt it – that pain and stiffness that occurs several hours (and even days!) after unaccustomed exercise or overworking a particular muscle group. Known as ‘delayed onset muscle soreness’ (DOMS), we typically experience these pains when eccentric muscle activity is involved and the contracting muscles are forcibly lengthened.1 This mechanical stress triggers an inflammatory response and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in sustained inflammation and oxidative stress which can eventually lead to muscle injury and the dreaded DOMS.2

The medicinal benefits of regular turmeric consumption have been well documented; from improving brain function to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease, preventing and treating Alzheimer’s Disease and even fighting certain types of cancer. What is less commonly known is that Curcumin (the active constituent of Turmeric that gives it its distinctive yellow colour) has also proven to be beneficial in recovery from exercise due to its powerful antioxidant and inflammatory effects.

To test the theory, a trial was carried out to measure the effects of oral curcumin versus placebo on DOMS following unaccustomed heavy eccentric exercise. The study was a double-blind, randomised-controlled crossover trial in which the Curcumin or placebo were taken two days before to three days after eccentric exercise and the results found that only the Curcumin had beneficial effects. These included:

  • moderate to large reductions in single-leg squat and gluteal stretch pain at 24 and 48 hours post exercise,
  • reduced pain on walking down stairs, and
  • improved muscle performance.3

Another recent randomised, placebo-controlled, single-blind trial comparing Curcumin with placebo was designed to assess the muscle damage of healthy male volunteers after performing a 45 minute downhill running race. Results found that 1g of turmeric given twice daily resulted in:

  • reduced MRI evidence of muscle injury in the posterior and medial compartment of both thighs,
  • less pain in the lower legs, and
  • reduced systemic inflammatory response in comparison to placebo.2

The results from these studies suggest that turmeric has the potential to be very beneficial in reducing post-exercise soreness after high intensity training.

Nuzest’s Chai, Turmeric and Maca Clean Lean Protein (CTM-CLP) contains 1g of 100% pure Indian turmeric root and 19g of digestible protein per 25g serve, making it the perfect pre- and post-workout supplement. Because Curcumin alone has a very low bioavailability, CTM-CLP also contains 100mg of black pepper per serve which has been proven to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin in humans by 2000%.4 A clinical study conducted on elite rugby players has shown that the combination of curcumin and piperine (black pepper’s active ingredient) supplementation before and after exercise may help lessen some aspects of muscle damage.5

So if you’re looking to dial up the intensity of your training, or you want to recover and get back into it faster, try adding turmeric to your diet.

References:

1Proske, U., & Morgan, D. L. (2001). Muscle damage from eccentric exercise: mechanism, mechanical signs, adaptation and clinical applications. The Journal of Physiology, 537(Pt 2), 333–345. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7793.2001.00333.x

2Drobnic, F., Riera, J., Appendino, G., Togni, S., Franceschi, F., & Valle, X. et al. (2014). Reduction of delayed onset muscle soreness by a novel curcumin delivery system (Meriva®): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of The International Society of Sports Nutrition, 11(1), 31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-11-31

3Nicol, L., Rowlands, D., Fazakerly, R., & Kellett, J. (2015). Curcumin supplementation likely attenuates delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). European Journal of Applied Physiology, 115(8), 1769-1777. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-015-3152-6

4Shoba, G., Joy, D., Joseph, T., Majeed, M., Rajendran, R., & Srinivas, P. (1998). Influence of Piperine on the Pharmacokinetics of Curcumin in Animals and Human Volunteers. Planta Medica, 64(4), 353-356. http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-957450

5Delecroix, B., Abaïdia, A. E., Leduc, C., Dawson, B., & Dupont, G. (2017). Curcumin and Piperine Supplementation and Recovery Following Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, 16, 147-153.

 

The Benefits of Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT) for Energy and Exercise

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MCTs

Fats – the endless scrutiny continues. Which ones are bad for us? Which ones are meant to be good for us? Which ones will make us put on weight? Everyone seems to have a different opinion. The good news is there is one type of fat that experts agree we don’t need to be concerned about – one that is not only good for our health but can also improve our energy and the quality of our workouts.

Medium Chain Triglycerides/Triacylglycerols (MCTs) are a unique form of dietary fat that provide numerous health benefits. Their reduced chain length not only means that they carry fewer calories, it also allows for accelerated metabolic conversion. This means that instead of our bodies storing them as fat (like Long Chain Fatty acids (LCTs)), the calories in MCTs are used immediately by our organs and muscles, making it one of the fastest, cleanest sources of fuel for the body.

MCTs have gained popularity with athletes looking to increase energy levels and enhance endurance during high-intensity exercise. 1 A review of the literature has shown that short-term ingestion of foods containing a small amount of MCTs suppresses the increase in blood lactate concentration and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during moderate-intensity exercise; whilst extending the duration of subsequent high-intensity exercise, at levels higher than those achieved by ingestion of LCT-containing foods.2

MCTs have also been found to assist with weight loss because of their lower caloric content than other fats, as well as their ability to enhance metabolism, increase energy expenditure, and promote the production of ketones – all without adversely affecting metabolic risk factors such as cholesterol and blood pressure.1,3,4,5 Scientists have attributed the energy-enhancing properties of MCTs to their rapid formation of ketone bodies thus making them an excellent choice for anyone that has increased energy needs or requires enhanced athletic performance.

Now that we have cleared the air on this group of ‘super’ fats, it’s time to put them to use in your own daily routine. Nuzest’s Coffee, Coconut + MCT Clean Lean Protein contains approximately 600mg of coconut-derived MCTs per 25g serve, making it the perfect pre-workout protein smoothie.

Click here for our Pre-Workout Coffee, Coconut + MCT thick shake recipe to help get the best out of every workout.

 

References:

  1. Dean, W. & English, J. (2013). Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) – Beneficial Effects on Energy, Atherosclerosis and Aging. Retrieved from https://nutritionreview.org/2013/04/medium-chain-triglycerides-mcts/
  2. Nosaka, N., Suzuki, Y., Nagatoishi, A., Kasai, M., Wu, J., & Taguchi, M. (2009). Effect of Ingestion of Medium-Chain Triacylglycerols on Moderate- and High-Intensity Exercise in Recreational Athletes. Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, 55(2), 120-125. http://dx.doi.org/10.3177/jnsv.55.120
  3. Mumme, K., & Stonehouse, W. (2015). Effects of Medium-Chain Triglycerides on Weight Loss and Body Composition: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Journal of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115(2), 249-263. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2014.10.022
  4. Rego Costa, A. C., & Rosado, E. L., & Soares-Mota, M. (2012). Influence of the dietary intake of medium chain triglycerides on body composition, energy expenditure and satiety; a systematic review. Nutricion Hospitalaria, 27(1), 103-108.
  5. St-Onge, M.-P., Bosarge, A., Goree, L. L. T., & Darnell, B. (2008). Medium Chain Triglyceride Oil Consumption as Part of a Weight Loss Diet Does Not Lead to an Adverse Metabolic Profile When Compared to Olive Oil. Journal of the American College of Nutrition27(5), 547–552.

 

The Importance of Protein in an Active Lifestyle

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I think by this stage almost everyone knows that they ‘need’ protein, but in my lectures and workshops I still get questions like, “but won’t protein make me bulky?”, or, “won’t eating too much protein give me big muscles?”. And while most of us know that we do need to be eating ‘enough’ protein, less know how much ‘enough’ is and why it’s important!

What is it?
Protein quite simply is the building block of most of the structures in the body. ‘Protein’ is the name given to groupings of amino acids. Protein is broken down to these amino acids which are then used to create enzymes, muscle tissue, bone matrix and many other structural components of the body. All cells require protein.

Quick Fact: Over 98% of ALL the cells in your body are replaced every year!

Why do we Need it?
It helps us to become and remain lean! Protein has a higher ‘thermic effect of feeding’ (TEF) rating than either carbohydrates or fat. This means that when a higher proportion of your diet is protein your metabolic rate (and consequently fat loss) is going to be higher.

Improved Lean Body Mass
An optimal protein intake will allow us to maintain a higher lean body mass. This helps to give us the lean, fit looking physique that many desire (but not ‘bulky’!) whilst also improving metabolic rate further and helping to decrease fat stores and maintain leanness.

Improved Alertness and Focus
Amino acids supply the raw material for the excitatory neurotransmitters such as epinephrine, nor-epinephrine and dopamine. When we do not have enough of these amino acids we are more likely to suffer mental fatigue and physical fatigue.

Bone Structure and Health
Protein provides the matrix for bone and connective tissue. Ample protein helps to provide the structure for healthy bones!

How Much do we Need?
The recommended daily intake (RDA) for protein is based on the activity level of sedentary individuals and is measured by looking at the amount of protein taken in and compared with the amount excreted. It is approximately 0.8 grams per kilo of bodyweight.

What the RDA Doesn’t Take into Account
RDA and DRI (Dietary Reference Intakes) are ‘necessary’ amounts for baseline health. In other words – survival. But the optimal amounts we need in order to thrive may be much different!

As long ago as 1975 Gontzea et al have shown that a level of 1.5grams per day per kilo of bodyweight were insufficient when exercise was undertaken and other studies have shown that Tour de France athletes were only able to maintain a positive nitrogen balance at an intake of 1.8g per kilo per day.

Levels up to 3g per kg bodyweight per day (over 3 x the RDA) have been demonstrated to increase lean body mass, reduce fat mass and improve performance.

Most people will do well to get at least the RDA level with additional protein if and when able but overall quantity should be less important though, than eating good quality protein consistently.

The key ‘take home’ point is to eat quality protein at every meal.

Examples of Good Clean Green Plant Based Sources Would be

  • Sprouted lentils, chick peas or mung beans
  • Nuts or seeds (almonds, Brazil nuts, pumpkin seeds)
  • Tempeh or other fermented protein foods.
  • One 25g serve of Clean Lean Protein provides 22g of high quality protein.

The Singapore International Triathlon

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Singapore International Marathon

The Singapore International Triathlon was a two-in-one meet for triathletes aiming to claim national glory. Besides serving as a national championship, the Sunday morning race also served as the final qualifying meet for athletes aspiring to be nominated to next year’s Commonwealth Games.

In this year’s championships, elite triathletes have a designated local-only category (1stwave start of the day at about 7:20 am) and we were also allowed to draft. There were 11 elite men and 3 elite females on the start line.

The swim leg was good, and into and out of T1, we had a tight bunch of 4. The pack worked really well together on the bike and that allowed us to adopt a pack strategy as we pulled and widened the gap between us and the rest. Transition through T2 was fast and I was out on the run in a blink. I went pretty hard on the 1st 3 km into the run to widen the lead as much as possible. My goal was just to go hard today and start getting on the ITU board for some valuable points to build a strong case for my nomination to compete at the Commonwealth Games, although I’ve already been nominated.

It has been a whirlwind since the beginning of this year for me, and I must honestly say it really hit me hard, really hard. I have my parents to thank for alwaysbeing there with and for me through these turbulent times. It helps, it really helped a lot – their advice, wisdom, warmth, love and above all their arms and shoulders are always a place I can turn to cry, hug and hide when I want to shut myself out and reflect.

The smiles came from loads of perspiration, tears, pain, sacrifices, commitment and my supportive and much-valued sponsors.

Thank you Nuzest for your never-ending support and encouragement. Securing my nomination with the Federation for both the Commonwealth & Asian Games in 2018, means a lot more work and sacrifice, goals to be achieved. Nuzest has become a necessary part of my day, and I’m really grateful for your faith in me and bringing me onboard. I am sure we’ll do Singapore proud together.

My next race in Japan – Murakami, on 24th September, will be a standard distance race. Till the next report, here’s wishing you pleasant weeks ahead. Tune-in then for more pictures and action in 2 weeks’ time.

There’s lots of work to do, and reflections to fine tune my standard distance race as I prepare for it.

The Steve Waugh Foundation’s “The Captain’s Ride”

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Trevor Bolland, Nuzest’s founder and CEO is three months shy of participating in The Captain’s Ride; an annual 6 day, 800km bike tour of Tasmania in support of the Steve Waugh Foundation.

The Steve Waugh Foundation exists to champion the stories, provide life changing support and improve the quality of life for children and young adults (0-25) living with a rare disease. The Captain’s Ride is as beautiful as it is grueling, covering an expansive range of terrains over the distance.

Trevor is no stranger to committing his time, money and efforts into doing what he can in the hopes of improving the lives of others, in fact he has built his Sydney-based, globally reaching company on the premise of aiming to do just that.

His foray into the health industry was catalyzed in 2005 when his 23-year-old daughter was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis – an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system for which modern medicine is yet to find a cure. Not satisfied with the bleak prognosis they were given they looked to experts all over the world for advice – from neurologists and scientists, to naturopaths and everyone in between.

The knowledge and insight they gained over those years was life changing and resulted in careers in the health industry for both, planting the seeds for what is now Nuzest – Nutrition for Life.

Armed with a team of world-renowned health professionals they developed Nuzest – a nutritional platform based on efficacy without compromise; bringing together the best of nutritional science and natural medicine

Nuzest products are designed to offer complete nutritional support to those suffering with chronic disease, those affected by dietary restrictions and people seeking to deal with weight problems. It aims to fill the nutritional gaps caused by consuming nutrient-deficient food, our modern stressful lifestyles and poor eating habits.

The Captain’s Ride is another opportunity for Trevor to continue his path of simply wanting to do what he can to help. Whilst each participant is set to raise a minimum of $10,000, Trevor has set his sights on $15,000, which he hopes will make a big difference to the lives of these courageous young people.

If you’d like to support Trevor in achieving his goal and contribute to putting rare diseases on the map any donation big or small will be so appreciated.

Link to Trevor’s fundraising page: https://www.stevewaughfoundation.com.au/events/fundraiser-dashboard?memberId=3917

If you’d like any further information on the event please see the website link: https://www.stevewaughfoundation.com.au/the-captains-ride/

And here’s a look at the 2016 ride: https://vimeo.com/208577694

Race report #3 from Triathlete and Nuzest Ambassador, Bryce Chong

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It’s such a blessing when the race site has scenic views and clear waters. The weather was hot, but with the race starting at 5.45 am, it settled pleasantly. The sunrise was also early and beautiful.

The Standard Distance race for Elite men was on 13th August 2017. It was a pontoon start, with a line-up of 27 elite men from 9 different countries.

The currents were pretty strong that morning with an incoming tide, but I was able to maintain and managed a decent 1500-meter swim. I exited from the swim with the 2nd pack (there were 6 of us), and we maintained this 2nd pack for the entire 40 km bike route. There were 4 people in the lead pack. It was a scenic 4 loops, but it went pretty fast on relatively flat grounds. Our pack worked really well on the bike, and that helped us increase the gap from the chase pack.

The run was 3 loops of 3.333 km. Off the bike, I felt pretty good on the run. Water stops were well spaced out and I made sure to hydrate well because the temperature was rising fast. I maintained a good pace for 8 km with good surges. I started to feel the pain creeping in after the 8 km mark, but I’ve been working on learning to curb and endure this strain and pain, and still push on with a steady pace. Overall, it was a pretty decent run and I finished the race 15th overall, with a time of 2 hours 01 minute and 57 secs.

I was happy with my race outing at Mt. Mayon, especially after my run at Palembang just over 2 weeks ago.

When I returned, I had 2 full days off of training. Then, it was back to training full swing last weekend to prepare for the National Championship on 10th September 2017, and maybe another race end of September (not yet confirmed), as well as a race in 3rd week of October in Hong Kong.

Thank you Nuzest for your never-ending support and encouragement, it really spurs me on. I comforted and blessed to know I am not alone in my journey.

 

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